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Andrew R. Schwartz
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Employing the Confession of Judgment in Illinois

Confession-of-judgment clauses let creditors circumvent the normal judicial process and obtain a judgment. Promissory notes, guaranties and other contracts may include them. 

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Mr. Schwartz and Mr. Kanyock IICLE chapter on fraudulent transfer litigation

Litigating the Suit to Set Aside a Fraudulent Transfer.

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When Should I Use an Out-of-Jurisdiction Lawyer?

Federalism presents numerous positive aspects. But if you’re an attorney who must reach across state lines to resolve a case, our federal system does not exactly roll out the welcome mat.

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How Attorneys Collect Court Judgments Across State Lines

After fighting for years to win a judgment, many attorneys find themselves facing a second — and equally difficult — fight to collect the judgment.

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Unwinding Fraudulent “Estate Planning” Transfers

The lack of reasonably equivalent value in return for the transfer of an asset common indicates that a fraudulent transfer has occurred.

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ESI Discovery Issues in Business Litigation

Electronically stored information (ESI) has revolutionized the business world. Unfortunately, the law has not entirely caught up.

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Injunctive Relief for Anticipatory Breach of Contract in the Wrigley Rooftops Lawsuit

Most contract litigation occurs after a breach, when the harm has already occurred. In such cases, the remedy can include monetary damages for losses and equitable relief to prevent future losses.

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When Should Commercial Litigation Go to Federal Court?

Commercial litigants need a litigation strategy before filing suit. Part of that strategy involves targeting the proper court to hear your claim.

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Important New Collection Case

On November 5, 2014, the Illinois Appellate Court, First District, preliminarily released its opinion in Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota, NA v. Envirobusiness, Inc., 2014 IL App (1st) 133575, which provides important guidance on several aspects of collection law under §2-1402 of Illinois’ Code of Civil Procedure (“Code”). 

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FAQs About Receiverships

What is a “receiver”? A “receiver” is a court officer appointed to protect property in dispute during the pendency of a lawsuit. As a court officer, a receiver has no discretion or personal control over the property he holds, but must obey court orders.

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11 - 20 of 54
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